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Posts tagged ‘movie stars’

Press Release

May 29, 2014

Susan Marg

Cowgirl Jane Press

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

HOLLYWOOD OR BUST  WINS AWARD.

The National Indie Excellence Book Awards Recognizes Excellence.

Book Cover

This month the National Indie Excellence Awards (NIEA) announced the winners of its annual contest. The competition acknowledges self-publishers and small and independent presses that go the extra mile to produce high quality books, from eye-catching design to well-written content. Judges represent all aspects of the industry and include publishers, writers, editors, book cover designers and professional copywriters.

Author Susan Marg entered her book Hollywood or Bust in the category “Arts& Entertainment.” It was the perfect fit. Hollywood or Bust consists of over five hundred quips, quotes, and off-the-cuff remarks of actors, directors, writers, and others involved in making movies and conveys what Hollywood insiders think of themselves, their lives, their fame, their careers, each other, and the town itself.

Marg is pleased that this well-regarded organization recognized her efforts. “Hollywood or Bust was a lot of work, but it was fun to research and put together,” she comments, adding, “It’s a fun read, too – like overhearing a conversation at Starbucks.”

Hollywood or Bust, ISBN 978-0-578-11882-6, is a 182-page paperback book consisting of seven chapters and twenty original photographs.  Topics cover dreams of success to attending the Oscars.  It lists for $14.95.

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 Susan Marg is the author of Las Vegas Weddings: A Brief History, Celebrity Gossip, Everything Elvis, and the Complete Chapel Guide, published by HarperCollins.  Since she has moved her field of focus from the City of Lights to the City of Angels, her interest in popular culture has only intensified.

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Blog

October 17, 2013

Susan Marg

On Hollywood Boulevard:

Something Old, Something New

Some of the cast of Ocean's Eleven? No, it's Harpo, Groucho, Zeppo, and Chico Marx with Sid Grauman - 1933.  Photo from: Dennis Amith

Some of the cast of Ocean’s Eleven? No, it’s Harpo, Groucho, Zeppo, and Chico Marx with Sid Grauman – 1933. Photo from: Dennis Amith

Hollywood’s Chinese Theatre was reopened in September after a four-month renovation.  Now called TCL, rather than Grauman’s, after a Chinese television manufacturer bought naming rights, the venue now has one of the country’s largest IMAX screens and almost a thousand stadium seats, once again spacious enough to host movie premieres and accommodate the attendant paparazzi.

But the best news for movie fans?  The iconic imprints of our favorite superstars are still in place.

In 1927 Douglas Fairbanks, and Mary Pickford, the King of Hollywood and America’s Sweetheart, as well as co-owners of the theater with Sid Grauman, were the first to officially step in wet cement.  They each had their own square smack dab in front of the entrance.

Many others, by themselves, as a couple, or in a group, have followed.

It must be lonely on the range because singing cowboys signed for themselves and their horse. If you look around, you’ll find Tom Mix and Tony, Gene Autry and Champion, Roy Rogers and Trigger.  “Happy trails” to you and your four-legged partner, too.

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers are co-located, although he got his square in 1938 and she followed, as usual, one year later.

Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy share space, as do Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. Harpo, Zeppo, Chico, and Groucho, who also left an imprint of his cigar, fell all over themselves to get their hands dirty.

When Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was released in 1953, Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe were memorialized in adjoining areas, writing the movie title above their signatures. Three years later in honor of the movie Giant, Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and director George Stevens left their mark on the same day. If this was some sort of stunt to publicize their movies, who cares?

Certainly not Brad Pitt, George Clooney, and Matt Damon fans. A big crowd greeted them and producer Jerry Weintraub of Ocean’s Eleven, Twelve, and Thirteen at their signing-in ceremony in 2007. As Clooney said, “If I had to be on my hands and knees with three other guys, I can’t think of three better guys to do it with.”

Do you think the Star Trek cast plus creator Gene Roddenberry were thinking the same thing when they were honored with a square in 1991? After all, together they had gone “where no man has gone before.” They are to the right of the box office. Star Wars stars Darth Vader, R2D2, and C3PO are on the left.

More recently the Twilight Saga‘s Robert Pattinson, Kristen Stewart, and Taylor Lautner celebrated the release of Breaking Dawn — Part 1 by participating in this Hollywood tradition.  Stewart summed up the experience exclaiming, “I think this is the coolest thing ever.”

If the past is a guide to the future, as an ancient Chinese proverb divines, the popularity of the Chinese Theatre, regardless of its name, is ensured for a long time to come.

© 2013 Susan Marg – All Rights Reserved

Blog Photos

October 3, 2013

Susan Marg

Big Feet. Big Hands. Big Heart.*

Arnold Schwarzenegger wears size 12 boots.

He means it when he says,

“I’ll be back.”

Photo by: Susan Marg. Taken at Grauman's Chinese Theatre; Hollywood Boulevard.

 

“In this industry, there are only two ways up the ladder.

Rung by rung or claw your way to the top.

It’s sure been tough on my nails.”

— Jack Nicholson

Photo by: Susan Marg. Taken at Grauman's Chinese Theatre; Hollywood Boulevard.

 

“Everybody, no matter how old you are, is around 24, 25 in their heart.”

— Bruce Willis

Photo by Susan Marg. Taken at Grauman's Chinese Theatre; Hollywood Boulevard.

 

 

* Photos by: Susan Marg.  Taken at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre;

Hollywood Boulevard; Hollywood, CA.

 

 

 

Blog Quotes

September 21, 2013

Susan Marg

Seen and Heard on Hollywood Boulevard:

“Lovely Ladies Waiting for a Bite”*

* From Les Miserables

"My idea of a movie star is Joan Crawford, who can chew up two directs and three producers before lunch." -- Shelley Winters of Joan Crawford (Photo by: George Hurrell)

“My idea of a movie star is Joan Crawford, who can chew up two directors and three producers before lunch.” — Shelley Winters of Joan Crawford (Photo by: George Hurrell)

"I think my mouth just opens, and I spontaneously say things that occur to me."  -- Helena Bonham Carter (Photo by: David Torcivia)

“I think my mouth just opens, and I spontaneously say things that occur to me.” — Helena Bonham Carter (Photo by: David Torcivia)

"I knew that with a mouth like mind, I just hadda be a star or something." -- Barbra Streisand (photo by: Allan Warren)

“I knew that with a mouth like mind, I just hadda be a star or something.” — Barbra Streisand (Photo by: Allan Warren)

"I have a mouth,  and I'm not afraid to use it." --Megan Fox (Photo by: Nicoles Genim)

“I have a mouth, and I’m not afraid to use it.” –Megan Fox (Photo by: Nicoles Genim)

"I ate a bug once. It was flying around me. I was trying to get it away. It went right in my mouth." -- Hilary Duff (photo by David Shankbone)

“I ate a bug once. It was flying around me. I was trying to get it away. It went right in my mouth.” — Hilary Duff (Photo by: David Shankbone)

Blog

August 11, 2013

Susan Marg

“I never really thought of myself as a sex goddess,” said the glamorously beautiful Rita Hayworth, as quoted in Hollywood or Bust: Movie Stars Dish on Following their Dreams, Making it Big, and Surviving in Tinseltown, “I felt I was more a comedian who could dance.” And dance she did.

Rita as Gilda.

Rita as Gilda.

Hayworth performed an erotic Dance of the Seven Veils in Salome (1953), a mesmerizing strip-tease, taking off only her over-the-elbow length black satin evening gloves to “Put the Blame on Mame,” in Gilda (1946), and an equally captivating nightclub act in An Affair in Trinidad (1952).

While some of Hayworth’s well-known handsome leading men included Orson Welles, whom was her second husband, Glenn Ford, who appeared with her in five movies, Cary Grant, Victor Mature, Tyrone Power, Robert Mitchum, and the list goes on, her dancing partners were among Hollywood’s biggest and best musical talents.

She co-starred with Fred Astaire in You’ll Never Get Rich (1941) and You Were Never Lovelier (1942).  She kicked up her heels with newcomer Gene Kelly in Cover Girl (1944) and later took a turn around the dance floor with Frank Sinatra in Pal Joey (1957).

But Rita never danced to the Bee Gees – until now: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mz3CPzdCDws

Eat your heart out, John Travolta.

© 2013 Susan Marg – All Rights Reserved

Blog

July 31, 2013

Susan Marg

Hear Ye Hear Ye:

Talking About the Stars

Yesterday afternoon I had the pleasure of chatting with Betty Jo Tucker, movie critic extraordinaire and the editor/lead critic of ReelTalk Movie Reviews, and her co-host James Colt Harrison, also an author of thousands of reviews and articles about Hollywood, on Betty Jo’s radio program “Movie Addict Headquarters.”

My book Hollywood or Bust was the central point of our conversation, and I was peppered with lots of questions.  Where did the idea come from?  What was the biggest challenge in writing the book?  How did you decide on the themes in the book?  What are your favorite quotes in the book?

Oh, there are so many.  I like the first quote in the book from Hilary Swank: “I’m just a girl from a trailer park who had a dream.”  I think that sets the tone of the book because Hollywood and the movies, even life itself, are all about dreams.

On the loss of privacy that comes with fame, I like Jennifer Aniston’s quote: “When someone follows you all the way to the shop and watches you buy a roll of toilet paper, you know your life has changed.”  The lesson here is to be careful for what you wish.

Betty Jo had her favorite quotes, too.  She pointed out how touched she was by  Charlie Chaplin saying, “I was loved by crowds, but I didn’t have a single close friend. I felt like the loneliest man alive,” and she played a few minutes of music Chaplin composed for Modern Times.  Afterwards she noted, “There he is making everyone else laugh, but he had such feeling.”  And, then we moved on to more amusing topics.

James shared a story relating a chance meeting between Clark Gable and William Faulkner on the MGM lot where they were both working in the 1930s.  Clark Gable knew who William Faulkner was, but Faulkner couldn’t return the compliment.  Ah, writers.  What would the movies be without them?

As screenwriter Joe Eszterhas has noted: “Screenplays are a bitch to write.  One man wrote War and Peace.  Thirty-five screenwriters wrote The Flintstones.” Ah, Hollywood.

If you want to hear more, here’s the link for your listening pleasure:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/movieaddictheadquarters/2013/07/30/hollywood-or-bust

Review

July 4, 2013

Susan Marg

Reviewed by Gayle Colopy for Bookpleasures.com  on July 2, 2013

 

Hollywood or Bust

By Susan Marg

Publisher: Cowgirl Jane Press

ISBN: 978-0-578-11882-6

 

Hollywood Or Bust is a collection of celebrity quotes from actors, producers and other notables in the film industry. The quotes are grouped in chapters loosely based around the quest for recognition and fame, the up and downsides of having achieved it (or not), and the inevitable downhill slide once the public has moved on to newer, fresher flavors of celebrity. The book covers a wide time span, with quotes from studio heads of the “Golden Age” of motion pictures to contemporary luminaries like Lindsay Lohan and Quentin Tarantino.

The path to stardom begins with a vision. (Hilary Swank: “I’m just a girl from a trailer park who had a dream.” Each has their own definition of what stardom means. (Harrison Ford: “Stars are people who sell a lot of popcorn.”) There are ruminations on the effects of stardom. (Clint Eastwood: “It’s like waking up with a hooker – how the hell did I get here?” Robert Mitchum: “I’ve still got the same attitude I had when I started. I haven’t changed anything but my underwear.”)

There is a price to be paid for success. (Bette Midler: “The worst part of success if to try to find someone who is happy for you.”) Artistic ambitions may take a back seat to other considerations. (Charlton Heston: “The trouble with movies as a business is that they’re an art; the trouble with movies as an art is that they’re a business.” Michael Caine: “You get paid the same for a bad film as you do for a good one.”) Disillusionment may set in. (William Faulkner: Hollywood is a place where a man can get stabbed in the back while climbing a ladder.” Marilyn Monroe: “Hollywood is a place where they’ll pay you a thousand dollars for a kiss and fifty cents for your soul.”

Eventually, there is a fall from grace. (Michael Medevoy, producer: “This is a business that eats its elders instead of its young.” Joan Collins: “The problem with beauty is that it’s like being born rich and getting poorer.”) The stars may come and go, but that entity known as Hollywood lives forever, a force unto itself. (Michelangelo Antonioni: “Hollywood is like being nowhere and talking to nobody about nothing.”

The collection is a slim, breezy read, something one could knock off during a long waiting room visit or a very short flight. Like junk food, there’s not much nutritional value here, but for those with an interest in stars talking about stardom, Hollywood Or Bust may prove to be irresistible.

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The reviewer Gayle Colopy:  Gayle is a semi-retired veteran of various governmental, non-profit and commercial enterprises, and is now a freelance writer based in northern California. His literary preferences are Beat-era American literature, classic erotica, and fiction writers who blossomed in the Sixties, including Joseph Heller, Donald Barthelme, Ken Kesey, Kurt Vonnegut, William S. Burroughs, Terry Southern, and Hunter S. Thompson.

Press Release

April 4, 2013

Susan Marg

Cowgirl Jane Press

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CELEBRITIES HAVE MUCH TO SAY ABOUT HOLLYWOOD.

New Book Gives Insider Perspective.

Is there such a thing as too much information?  Not when it comes to Hollywood.

Movie fans obsessively follow their favorite actors on Twitter, read their autobiographies, and buy out issues of celebrity magazines to stay abreast of what’s happening. Now, Hollywood or Bust: Movie Stars Dish on Following their Dreams, Making it Big, and Surviving in Tinseltown gives a unique perspective on what it’s like to live and work where stars are born and movies are made.

Author Susan Marg culled over five hundred quips, quotes, and off-the-cuff remarks of actors, directors, writers, and others involved in the business from magazines, interviews, biographies, autobiographies, and, in this day and age, the Internet.  All told the quotes convey what insiders think about themselves, their lives, their fame, their careers, each other, and the town itself.

“Their observations, on one hand, are caustic, critical, and cynical,” Marg notes, “But they are also eye-opening, amusing, inspiring, and, in some cases, even endearing. She further adds, “Be prepared to be surprised.”

Hollywood or Bust, ISBN 978-0-578-11882-6, is a 182-page paperback book consisting of seven chapters and twenty original photographs.  Topics cover dreams of success to attending the Oscars.  It lists for $14.95.

###

            Susan Marg is the author of Las Vegas Weddings: A Brief History, Celebrity Gossip, Everything Elvis, and the Complete Chapel Guide, published by HarperCollins.  Since she has moved her field of focus from the City of Lights to the City of Angels, her interest in popular culture has only intensified.